Periodic Table’s 7th Row Completed With 4 Newly-Discovered Elements

The scientific world has much to celebrate: the famous periodic table has finally had its 7th row filled with the addition of 4 new elements discovered by different teams of researchers.

Kosuke Morita from the Riken Nishina Center shows off element 113 in the completed row of the periodic table at a press conference in Wako, Saitama prefecture, near Tokyo, on december 31, last year. Photo credits: Kyodo News.
Kosuke Morita from the Riken Nishina Center shows off element 113 in the completed row of the periodic table at a press conference in Wako, near Tokyo, on December 31, last year. Photo credits: Kyodo News.

Following the discovery of 4 new elements, the periodic table’s 7th row has finally been filled. The possible existence of the elements in question was mentioned before but never confirmed. Until now. They have now been proven to have atomic numbers 113, 115, 117 and 118.

The 4 new elements have been given temporary names and symbols: Uut for element 113, and ununpentium (Uup), ununseptium (Uus) and ununoctium (Uuo) for the other 3. This will be finalised in the near future.

Element 113 has been attributed to scientists from the RIKEN Institute from Wako, Japan (see picture above), and element 118, to a team consisting of researchers from Russia and the US from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory based in California. As for elements 115 and 117, they were discovered by the latter team working in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

The discoveries were confirmed, as reports the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), a “scientific, international, non-governmental and objective body” that deals with chemical sciences.

The names of the elements will be chosen by their discoverers. The Japanese scientists who found element 113 might ultimately name it “Japanium” as suggested in a report.

It is to be noted that these elements are not found naturally. Rather, they have to be produced under laboratory conditions. Furthermore, their existence lasts for a fraction of a second only. These very difficulties have delayed the confirmation of their discovery.

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